Magazine Articles

"The Skinny on Fat", a rebuttal to Gary Taubes'piece in The New York Times. Gastronomica, Winter, 2003

"Solar-Powered Timekeeping in Paris", The New York Times. March 16, 2003

"Women Who Eat Dirt", an exploration of the role of geophagy in the diet of omnivore. Gastronomica, Spring 2002.

"Foraging on a Wild Mushroom Tour," The New York Times, August 4, 2002.

"Stone Walls," The New York Times, June 3, 2001

Additional Works:

The Primal Feast: Food, Sex, Foraging, and Love (Crown, 2000)


Some people write about food history; I write about food prehistory: how the search for food has shaped human evolution, including the relationship between the sexes.

"The foodie facts and fictions that Allport gathers may come as no surprise to anthropologists, biologists, and others studying what goes into our stomanchs and why, but it's fascinating stuff for the lay reader" The New York Times"A crisp volume good enough to eat." Publishers WeeklyWinner of a Washington Irving Book Award

A Natural History of Parenting (Crown, 1996)


"A very readable account of the marvelous diversity of the animal world." The Independent Reader "The many faces of parenting, from doting to the feckless, are given a mulling in this fine exegetic study from Allport." Kirkus, starred review A Natural Science Book Club Main Selection and winner of a Washington Irving Book Award

Sermons in Stone: The Stone Walls of New England and New York (W.W.Norton, 1990)


Sermons in Stone is a social history of stone walls and the people who built them. I began thinking about walls when my husband and I moved to Katonah and started talking walks in woods crisscrossed with walls.

"A well-written, fascinating contribution to the region's social and economic history." Boston Magazine "A lively and often thoughtful book, further enlivened my many fine line drawings." The New Yorker

Explorers of the Black Box: The Search for the Cellular Basis of Memory (W.W. Norton, 1986)


"...Allport deserves praise for a sensitive depiction of the all-too-human side of science" Psychology Today "...a rare insight into the pressure under which scientists work." New Scientist